Does Reading the News Lead to Less Anxiety Than Watching It?

Author offers 5 realistic tips for coping with pandemic overload

More than two months into the COVID-19 pandemic people are starting to get antsy for a return to normalcy. Rami Odeh (Oh-DAY), an author, certified exercise physiologist, personal trainer and corporate presenter, has found that his corporate clients are now seeking his advice on coping strategies they can offer their employees to lessen information overload and feelings of isolation.

Odeh, who is also an on- and off-road marathoner, said, “Surviving in the age of COVID-19 is akin to running a marathon … and there are five daily steps you can take to train for living in pandemic times.”

The author of the three-volume series Quiet The Noise is telling his clients to practice these moves.

  • Remember that scary news sells. Limit your consumption of news, particularly one or two hours before bedtime. Consider reading your news instead of watching it, whenever possible.
  • Stick with experts you already trust. Now isn’t the time to find new news sources, Odeh said. Stick with experts you have trusted for years, avoid jumping on the latest conspiracy theory and scrub your social media feed of negative posters and hateful talk about theories, opinions and politics.
  • Focus on what you can control. Spend most of your thoughts and time focused on the activities and areas of your life you can control. Do your best to let the rest go. Being past- or future-focused results in worry and stress. Focus on the present and the things within your control: your health, nutrition, sleep patterns, your attitude and perspective.
  • Follow the Sun. The immune-boosting, mood-elevating benefits of adequate Vitamin D are undisputable, Odeh said. Try to get direct sunlight on as much exposed skin as possible without applying sunscreen (at least 15 to 30 minutes). However, if you burn easily or are fair-skinned, limit your time and avoid sunburn.
  • Walk in Nature. Do something to move your body every day. It is better to walk 10 minutes a day, every day, than to only walk when you have time to do an hour. Structure and accountability help; get a friend to keep you accountable and on task! Have fun and enjoy nature, another thing that has been shown to boost immunity.

About Rami Odeh
Rami Odeh founded FormWell Personal Fitness Training, a personal training company in Sandy Springs, GA that he sold last year. His main focus since the 1990s is motivational speaking and coaching. He earned master’s degrees in industrial psychology and exercise physiology and is a certified exercise physiologist through the American College of Sports Medicine. Odeh worked as an exercise physiologist in the Outpatient Weight Reduction Clinic and the Diabetes Education Department of Northside Hospital in Atlanta.

(Press Release from PR Newswire, SOURCE Rami Odeh)

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